Updated: Monday, 11th November 2019 @ 9:47pm

Counterfeit clampdown: Stone Roses goods seized by trading standards at Manchester's Heaton Park gigs

Counterfeit clampdown: Stone Roses goods seized by trading standards at Manchester's Heaton Park gigs

By Alex McIntyre

Thousands of pounds worth of counterfeit clothes were seized from illicit street traders operating at the Stone Roses’ Heaton Park gigs last weekend.

Teams from Bury Council trading standards, GMP’s events team and Manchester Trading Standards carried out the operation which saw counterfeit t-shirts and zipped jackets seized.

Angela Lomax, from Bury Trading Standards, said that the teams were out over all three nights looking to disrupt the organised counterfeit clothing sellers.

“We wanted to send a clear message that they are not welcome in the borough and attempts to sell would be combated,” she said.

The amount of goods obtained over the weekend is thought to have a total street value of £9,615.

Peter Jagger, head of Bury Trading Standards, said: “Despite what some people believe, counterfeiting is not a victimless crime. It is a crime that affects other people and the wider community, and is often linked to serious crime.

"Concert goers shouldn’t buy fakes. Counterfeit goods are usually of poor quality, can be unsafe and come with no guarantees or warranty. 

“And the message to those peddling them is a simple one – don’t. If you’re caught you could be looking at an unlimited fine and/or 10 years in jail.” 

Detective Inspector Mark Hudson from North Manchester CID said: "Police officers worked closely with Trading Standards officers to clamp down on those dealing in counterfeit goods at this weekend’s concerts, resulting in almost 500 illegal items being seized. 

“Customers who focus on getting a bargain may not realise they are helping fund the lifestyles of criminals.

"The authorities can’t tackle this scourge alone and we need people to think before they buy to help us wipe out the market for counterfeit goods.” 

For more on this story and many others, follow Mancunian Matters on Twitter and Facebook.