Updated: Tuesday, 10th December 2019 @ 8:56am

Nissan dealership's charity event, in memory of Bury brain tumour teen Super Josh, hailed a huge success

Nissan dealership's charity event, in memory of Bury brain tumour teen Super Josh, hailed a huge success

| By Sophia Dellapina

A charity weekend in memory of Bury teen Super Josh, who died last year, has been hailed a huge success after it raised £1,100.

Car dealership RRG Nissan hosted the three day event of barbeques, face painting, raffles and a charity car wash for families and guests to raise money for the Joshua Wilson Brain Tumour Charity.

Josh died last year, age 14, after losing his battle with long-standing medical problems caused by complications during an operation to remove the brain tumour he was diagnosed with at just three and a half.

Mike Prince, Dealer Principal at the dealership, said: “Everyone who visited us over the weekend had a great time.

“The face-painting proved extremely popular as did the barbecue. It was all very upbeat, replicating Josh’s positive attitude to life.

“People know just how important the charity is and what fantastic work it does for children in the area.”

After undergoing lifesaving brain surgery, Josh was left with complex, physical difficulties such as epilepsy, scoliosis and joint problems.

The charity aims to improve the lives of children living with brain tumours and post-surgery disabilities, by supplying specialist equipment and house adaptations.

The brave little boy has touched the hearts of many, including the Nissan dealership who having recently supplied it a top-of-the-range Nissan Qashqai to use around the area.

Like many sick children in the UK, Josh didn’t allow his illness to hinder his life, and continued to make those around him smile.

His courage and love for life still inspires the charity to move forward and continue improve the lives of other children suffering from similar disabilities.

Josh’s mum Dawn Fidler said: “Its fundraising weekends like this that help make a difference to the lives of children with brain tumours and post-surgery disabilities.”