Updated: Monday, 14th October 2019 @ 2:46pm

Manchester's chilli-eating competition goes ahead safely just hours after two Edinburgh men hospitalised by curry challenge

Manchester's chilli-eating competition goes ahead safely just hours after two Edinburgh men hospitalised by curry challenge

By Mel Hughes

Brave contestants put their spice-o-meter to the test last night as Manchester’s annual chilli-eating competition took place in Albert Square as part of the Food and Drink Festival.

The competition saw father and son Geoffrey and John Slawson take part, and father Geoffrey was crowned the eventual winner for the second year in a row.

His son, John, said: “Last year, I was cheering him from the front row so this time I thought I’d sit next to him and give him some moral support.”

However, John retired after round seven of 13 and said: “I had to go because I thought I was going to be sick! I didn’t last as long as I’d hoped to.”


FEELING THE BURN: Contestants get ready to 'take the plunge'

He obviously doesn’t have his dad’s iron stomach yet.

Geoffrey, who was still feeling the after-burn when I tried to talk to him, confirmed that this was the second and last time he would compete in the contest on the grounds that it was “just too painful.”

It’s also worth noting that there was no prize for winning this event, just pride.

The hottest chilli, dubbed the hottest in the world, the Naga Jolokia measured around 1.2m on the Scoville scale. To put into context how hot these peppers are, green jalapenos measure at a measly 5,000 SHU and they’re enough for most people.

It was barely 24 hours since chilli-lovers taking part in a similar contest were hospitalised in Scotland but these guys didn’t seem fazed by that fact.


PUTTING ON A BRAVE FACE: John and Geoffrey Slawson following the competition

Phil Jones, one of the co-organisers of the whole event, said: “Well, they’re still with us. We’ve had similar cases where I thought people might have to go to hospital but they just vomited nicely and they were alright.”

The Edinburgh curry house in question left contestants writhing on the floor in agony, vomiting and fainting as well as seeing two hospitalised after the competition at the Kismot Indian restaurant.

Afterwards, the restaurant’s boss, Abdul Ali, promised to tone down the offending dish, entitled the Kismot Killer but the event will go ahead again next year.