Updated: Sunday, 19th November 2017 @ 8:06am

A-level results day 2017: Just 39% of Manchester students worried about their grades, according to survey

A-level results day 2017: Just 39% of Manchester students worried about their grades, according to survey

| By Maisy Szabo

Manchester students awaiting their A-level results are more optimistic about their results than anywhere else in the UK, according to a new survey.

The poll – conducted by Northumbria University – found that just 39% of teens are concerned that they won’t achieve the necessary grades to be accepted by their first-choice university.

This compares well to the 59% who are fretting about what results day will hold on Thursday, August 17.

This northern confidence sits at odds with its southern counterpart, uncovering a disproportionate awareness of clearing and adjustment.

Helen Bower, Assistant Marketing Director from Northumbria University, said: “The clearing process has changed significantly in recent years and the option to ‘trade up’ using adjustment now gives students the opportunity to reconsider their original choice if they have done better than expected in their exams.”

Despite this, a substantial 49% of students claimed they either hadn’t heard of clearing or were unsure about what it was, whilst only 31% were unaware of adjustment.

Of those students informed about clearing, confidence prevailed.

Just one third of Manchester’s teens are prepared to use the process upon discovering their grades are worse than expected.

Nevertheless, over half of the city’s students claim that they would still accept their existing offer at their chosen university if they achieved better grades than anticipated.

This steadfast mentality is supported by further findings that show that the ‘right course’ and academic reputation are the foremost influencers for teens when considering their future educational destinations.

Furthermore, results show that leading a happy and healthy life was regarded with equal value to having a successful career, revealing that Mancunian students appear to be less driven by long term financial incentives and more so by the aspiration to lead fulfilling and healthy lives.

Emily Hitchin, first-year student from Manchester at Northumbria University, said: “I really love my course so far, it has given me a passion for investments and I would like to go on to become an investment banker.”

The study has emphasised the importance of ensuring young people are equipped with a thorough understanding of the various options available to them prior to results day.