Updated: Thursday, 22nd February 2018 @ 2:24pm

Hate crime capital of England and Wales: Greater Manchester shamefully tops national statistics list

Hate crime capital of England and Wales: Greater Manchester shamefully tops national statistics list

By Dominic Claeys-Jackson

Greater Manchester is the hate crime capital of England and Wales, Home Office statistics have shown.

In 2011/12, Greater Manchester Police recorded 3,547 hate crimes, accounting for 8.1% of England and Wales’ 43,748 cases despite having just a 4.6% share of the population.

The county has the highest rate across all constabularies - excluding the City of London and the British Transport Police - with 1.35 hate crimes per 1,000 people.

This is in comparison to the complete England and Wales statistics, which is at 0.8 hate crimes per 1,000 people.

Garry Shewan, Assistant Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police, said: "We recognise that all forms of hate crime are under-reported, and tackling this remains one of GMP's main priorities.

“We are working hard to raise awareness of what hate crime is, how to report it and the support available to victims.

Greater Manchester Police recorded 17.1 hate crimes per 1,000 crimes last financial year, smashing the England and Wales total of 11 hate crimes per 1,000 crimes, according to The Guardian.

Assistant Chief Constable Shewan said: "In addition, officers are being trained on how to identify hate crime, and we also have officers working within our Partnership Teams who lead locally on working with our partners to tackle hate crime in our communities."

The Greater Manchester region aligned to the trends of England and Wales in terms of the prevalence of each type of hate crime.

Racially aggravated incidents were by far the biggest contributor, followed by sexual orientation, religion, disability and transgender.

Race crimes accounted for 2,974 (83.8%) of all hate crimes, whilst 303 (8.5%) were cases of hate based on sexual orientation.

Hate based on religion saw 180 cases over the twelve-month period (5.1%), whilst 73 (2.1%) were crimes relating to disability.

The rarest form of hate crime in Greater Manchester referred to the transgendered, with only 17 (0.5%) recorded cases.

A ‘hate crime’ is any criminal offence committed perceived to be motivated by hostility based on disability, race, religion, gender-identity or sexual orientation.

The vast majority of national cases last year involved violence against the victim, though criminal damage was also a common conviction.

For more on this story and many others, follow Mancunian Matters on Twitter and Facebook.