Updated: Tuesday, 23rd July 2019 @ 3:52pm

Manchester community leaders unite against cuts to give city 'service it deserves'

Manchester community leaders unite against cuts to give city 'service it deserves'

| By Koray Erol

Councillors and community leaders from across Manchester have got together to discuss the impact of public sector cuts on the safety and security of local communities.

Police and Crime Commissioner Tony Lloyd led the meeting of councillors, community leaders, voluntary and sector agencies at Bury Town hall on February 16 to discuss how services have been affected since the government cuts began in 2010.

Chief Constable Sir Peter Fahy said cuts to funding for Greater Manchester Police, the force is losing hundreds of police officers each year – it is believed the number of officers will have fallen by more than 2,000 by 2018.

Mr Lloyd said: “In Greater Manchester we haven’t shied away from the financial challenge by transforming the way we deliver services and working more closely with other agencies for the benefit of local people. But as I’ve said before, these government-imposed cuts are too deep and unfair.

“But the police aren’t the only victim of these cuts. More than £1.4billion has been axed from public services across Greater Manchester, including statutory and voluntary organisations.

“We are now at the point where the safety of communities is being put at risk. This event was the start a conversation looking at the real impact the cuts are having on our neighbourhoods and how we can work together better to try and keep our communities safe.” 

The 64-year-old commissioner emphasised that GMP have already lost 1,100 police officers and they are running out of money to be able to provide the service that the people of Greater Manchester deserve. 

“This is the start of a big conversation we want to have with all of the people of Greater Manchester. What we are demanding isn’t special treatment – it’s fair treatment,” he added.

GMP faces another £41million of cuts over the next 12 months and the budget is expected to be slashed by almost 50% by 2020.  

Image courtesy of University of Salford, with thanks.