Updated: Friday, 13th December 2019 @ 5:56am

North West parents believe computer games and school curriculums drain kids' creativity

North West parents believe computer games and school curriculums drain kids' creativity

| By Tommy Wilson

Parents in the North West believe the school curriculum and consumer technology are stifling their children’s creativity, according to a new study.

More than half of parents of children aged 5-11 think they were more creative when they were youngsters, with many laying the blame on the rise of computers.

Three quarters of parents worry that modern computer games don’t allow creative freedom in children, however, the same number also believe that modern technology can provide a vehicle for creativity when used correctly.

Manchester-based Paul Hutson, founder of educational online game Night Zookeeper, helped commission the research.

“In my opinion, too many games are taking up a great deal of children’s time where they are just asked to bash some buttons or wait 10 minutes until they can unlock a certain feature and bash some more buttons," said Mr Hutson.

“This can’t be good for their development. We’re hoping they take some time away from those games."

The interactive game, which is being used in more than 2,000 primary schools in the UK and a further 126 countries around the world, was invented to inspire creativity in children.

It provides a range of drawing, writing and creativity exercises whilst also allowing them to interact safely with other children online.

“When I first started Night Zookeeper, I knew that the power of technology could be used to enhance the level of creativity and imagination of kids from experiences they were getting everyday,” he told MM.

“There is a lot of content on the web where children just consume their entertainment, and one of the things I was really passionate about was giving them a platform for their creativity, so they were driving their journey and making their own fun.”

Almost 60% of parents of children aged 5-11 feel that the school curriculum has reduced opportunities for creative learning, with three-quarters of parents believing modern technology can be used to help develop creativity in children if used in the right way.

More than 90% of parents of believe creativity lessons should be added to the school curriculum, with 80% arguing that it is vital that a child’s imagination is allowed to run free.

Interested parents can learn more about the Night Zookeeper game here.

Image courtesy of Night Zookeper, via YouTube, with thanks