Updated: Sunday, 22nd September 2019 @ 6:10am

Oh behave! Manchester not so hot on 'sleazy' porn billboards

Oh behave! Manchester not so hot on 'sleazy' porn billboards

| By Lauren Woods

One of the world’s most popular adult websites Pornhub raised a few eyebrows – and libidos – after it erected a large advertsing banner in New York last week.

The company has been displaying non-graphic, but cleverly worded adverts as part of a new 'friendly' marketing strategy.

Last week Pornhub displayed a large billboard in New York's Time Square, only to be met with strong opposition from religious groups.

Pornhub’s first real-life billboard, which featured the slogan ‘All You Need is Hand’, was taken down after just a few hours.

While no official explanation was given as to why it was taken down so prematurely, it is believed the DoubleTree Hilton hotel, where the billboard was sited, had a hand in its ejection.

With this in mind, MM took to the streets of Manchester to ask the following question:

Would you object to billboard advertising of a porn website?

Option

Result

Yes

96%

No

4%

 

The result of MM’s poll came back pretty conclusive – Mancunians are not so hot for conventional advertising for pornographic websites.

Richard Johnson, a 44-year-old banker originally from New Zealand, said: "I'd object to it because it's sleazy.

"It is not the sort of thing you would want to promote your city with, especially if they became the notorious 'porn advertising' city."

Chris Field, 20, agreed. The law student from Fallowfield, said: "It's double standards and is probably not legal in our country.

"I know that strip clubs and things that don't actually feature sex are not allowed to promote themselves through mainstream advertising."


OVER THE LINE: David Grimshaw believes the ads would upset a lot of people

Ellie Johnson, a 21-year-old student from Rusholme, considered the impact it would have on children.

"It would be encouraging children to use these sorts of sites and I don't agree with it. Children need educating about this sort of thing. You can't have adverts and no education."

Nikki Mitchell, 22, agreed that protecting children needs to be the main priority.

The occupational therapist from Radcliffe, said: "I don't have kids but I can imagine I would not want them to see a big advert for a porn website.

"That sort of stuff can scar a kid for life if it sees it too early."

Larry Aitken, 54, a sand sculptor at Manchester's Arndale Centre, said: “It is immoral, pure and simple.

"It is easy money and that sort of thing is just not right, not what our city needs."


KICKING OFF: Kirsty Guy believes there would be uproar from the religious communities

Sean McKenzie, 33, a human resources manager from Cheetham Hill, was shocked that other cities would do it.

He said: "Surely they are rated sites? It's like someone advertising drugs."

Sue, a fellow worker from Cheetham Hill, agreed. She said: "It would make Manchester look trashy.

"I have two granddaughters and I would not want them to visit the city if that happened."

Kirsty Guy, a 23-year-old care worker originally from Liverpool, said: "My Christianity would say no.

"Imagine the upset it would cause amongst all the different religions in the city. Everyone would be kicking off."

David Grimshaw agreed with the view.

The 25-year-old call centre worker from Rusholme, said: "I think people would not let it stay up for long if it were to happen.


NO SLEAZE: Richard Johnson thinks Manchester's reputation could be seriously damaged

"It's a bit over the line. You can go a certain way and then you just upset too many people."

Kerry Rothwell, 21, from Salford had a very important point to make.

The trainee accountant said: "What if a kid logged on after seeing it and found their mum on it?

"Seriously, this could ruin lives."

However not everyone objected to the controversial advertising.

Thomas Hennessy, 23, who works as an engineer in his native Australia, said he wouldn’t have any issues it.

He said: "I'm a boy, I would not have a problem with it.

"I honestly don't think it is a moral issue and businesses can do what they like."

Image courtesy of Break France, via YouTube, with thanks.