Updated: Monday, 20th November 2017 @ 5:34pm

It is more than talking: Salford University promise 'real change' in Pendleton regeneration project

It is more than talking: Salford University promise 'real change' in Pendleton regeneration project

| By Alan Ross

Salford University have joined an ambitious £650million regeneration project to help rejuvenate the Pendleton area of the city.

The Pendleton Together partnership, launched in the summer of 2013, has already started work on the first phase of the scheme.

Plans include the building of 1,600 new homes as well as refurbishing another 1,250 homes.

Salford University Vice-Chancellor, Martin Hall, believes that the joint venture along with the Together Housing Group, Keepmoat and Salford City Council will help bring the city together.

“This partnership is about more than talking about the city’s problems,” he said.

“We want to show what can be achieved by working together in a true partnership – one that focuses on the needs of the community and brings about real change to the people of Pendleton and the communities of Salford.

“That’s what Pendleton Together is all about – it’s about adding real value to bring about real change. That’s why we’re proud to become an official Pendleton Together partner.”

The university will provide academic and research expertise during the project on a wide range of different areas from ecological sustainability to energy and healthcare.

Students will also make a documentary about the 15 year Pendleton Together initiative so that there is a recording of the changes to the area throughout the development.

Mike Taylor, Head of Industrial Partnerships, said that the university’s experience of working in industry would help the regeneration scheme.

“At the University of Salford we are in a very strong position to deliver ‘real life’ evidence based solutions to our industrial partners, practical solutions that address issues of strategic importance, the kind of stuff that keeps them awake at night.”

Image couresty of Salford University, via Flickr, with thanks