Updated: Wednesday, 22nd November 2017 @ 5:30pm

Feeling lucky to being plucky: Younger Manchester workers value salary over job security

Feeling lucky to being plucky: Younger Manchester workers value salary over job security

| By Becky Waterworth

Young workers in the North West are more likely to job-hop in search of higher pay and benefits than the previous generation, who prioritised job security, new research reveals.

The prime reasons behind choosing a job reflect the ever-improving economic activity in Manchester, according to the study by specialist global recruiter Randstad Care.

The years from 2013 onwards have seen economic recovery and affluence in the area, particularly in the job market.

And the number of North West workers regarding salary as one of the top five factors when deciding on a job nowadays has risen by almost 10% when compared to 2012 – from 52% to 61%.

The firm’s managing director Vicky Short said: “New workers in Manchester have moved from feeling lucky in a job to feeling plucky.

“They know the area has experienced a real renaissance in jobs growth and so are increasingly willing to demand more from their employers.”

In contrast, those hired during the economic crisis of 2008-2012, were simply happy to be in a job, regardless of pay and benefits.

With 2008-2010 bringing drastic cuts and a rise in unemployment of 4% (the second highest of all UK regions) any occupation was welcomed.

But, according to Ms Short, people’s attitudes changed to suit the chancing economic climate.

She said: “As the recovery gathered momentum in Manchester new entrants to the jobs market found themselves with greater choice than their predecessors.

“They became less concerned about job security and more selective about the pay and conditions being offered.”

As confidence in job availability has improved, so have the demands and desires of workers today.

The proportion of employees in the North West who said compensation is the most important factor they consider when choosing to work for a specific company almost doubled between 2012-2015.

Furthermore, in the most recent UK-wide survey, one in three 18-24-year-olds claimed that inadequate pay was one of the main factors behind their decision to find a new workplace.

Ms Short added: “Nationally, no group better emphasizes the new premium placed on pay than the younger generation.

“With less responsibilities tying them to a workplace, they are mobile enough to keep seeking out jobs with better salary terms.”

The managing director said it is time for the older working generation to learn something from the youngsters, especially with the announcement of devolution.

She said: “With the Government’s latest announcement of greater fiscal devolution to Manchester to further spur business activity there, all employees, not just the latest generation, should be looking forward to being more selective in an increasingly buoyant jobs market.

“Indeed, the older working generation can learn much from those more recently employed.

“They should keep their CV updated and be abreast of the latest opportunities in their sector to ensure they are always working where they are best compensated for their time and skills.”